ALUMNI

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“Growing our own” health professionals, and sustaining them, is what SEAHEC is all about. We love to hear success stories from our alumni, and share them with our readers. What has inspired you? Write us with your success stories. Share your photos and your triumphs. Here are a few from your colleagues.


SEAHEC Alumni Profile: Chukwuemeka “Emeka” Iloegbu

SEAHEC Intern, Chukwuemeka Arinze Iloegbu (Emeka) graduates from the Ichan School of Medicine at Mount Sinai with his Master of Public Health degree

SEAHEC alumnus Chukwuemeka “Emeka” Iloegbu has been keeping in touch with SEAHEC since his June, 2018 graduation from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. He considers himself fortunate to have received training and community experience at SEAHEC. Working in the community has transformed his way of thinking and has informed his approach toward the global issues marginalized groups face. Emeka hopes to apply what he has learned through community service to his upcoming opportunities. When Emeka last wrote to us, he was on his way to interview with the World Health Organization. Even though the position did not line up with his expectations, he will continue his research as a member of the Migration Health and Development Research Initiative. (MHADRI) as he continues to search for more community-related projects. “I am looking for something with a practical component,” he said in a recent email. He also shared the highlights of his summer and upcoming work: From September 24-28, Emeka completed the World Health Organization (WHO)Summer School on Refugee and Migrant Health, where following this experience, he received accreditation as a civil society special representative to attend a high level UN meeting in Marrakech Morocco December 4-11. He will participate… Continue reading

Kelly Lynn Neel

Kelly Lynn Neel SEAHEC intern 2017

Kelly Lynn Neel. University of Arizona, Bachelor of Science in Public Health. May, 2017. “I worked closely with the high school population in rural communities on the Tohono O’odham nation, as well as various high schools in the south Tucson area.” Continue reading